Recording: Near-Sighted on Far-Right Financing


This webinar discusses the ability of the existing global counterterrorist financing (CTF) regime, devised in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks and a threat landscape dominated by transnational jihadist terrorism, to counter today’s violent far-right groups and actors.

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In North America and Europe, far-right violence is most likely to be carried out by self-activating terrorists, with individuals or small cells operating autonomously to determine their targets. This is at odds with a CTF regime that relies on group designations and overt financial behaviours to identify and interdict terrorist financing.

To unpack this mismatch, join us for a discussion between experts on terrorist financing from RUSI’s Centre for Financial Crime and Security Studies (CFCS):

 

Drawing on his research examining North American and European far-right groups and agents, Stephen Reimer explains why approaches to CTF interventions require a rethink if they are to adequately respond to neo-Nazi and neo-fascist ideologies.

This event is chaired by Claudia Wallner, Research Fellow in RUSI’s Terrorism and Conflict research group.

This webinar is the third in a quarterly event series linked to RUSI's Far-Right Extremism and Terrorism (FRET) research programme. In this context, the 'far right' is understood as an umbrella term encompassing both the 'radical right' and the 'extreme right' on the right-wing spectrum; for more details on these definitions, please refer to our programme page. The primary focus is on movements where there is violent action or professed intent, or actions or narratives that might lead to or encourage others to resort to violence.

Near-Sighted on Far-Right Financing: Why we Need a CTF Rethink
Far-Right Extremism and Terrorism

Our research focuses on understanding the resurging threat of far-right extremism and terrorism.


FEATURING

Stephen Reimer

Associate Fellow

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Gonzalo Saiz

CFCS Research Analyst

Centre for Financial Crime and Security Studies

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Footnotes


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