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India's Nuclear Forces: The Challenges of Operationalization and Stability

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06 February 2014, 18:00
The UK Project on Nuclear Issues (UK PONI) hosted Gaurav Kampani of Cornell University for an evening seminar on 6 February to explore the links between India’s nuclear doctrine and forces, and their implications for stability in South Asia.

Since South Asia formally entered the nuclear club in 1998, its two main protagonists have followed distinct nuclear paths. While Pakistan has embraced nuclear war-fighting and developed the associated battlefield weapons, India has rejected the first-use of nuclear weapons and pursued a survivable ‘triad’ of strategic nuclear systems.

Some have looked at India’s recent nuclear developments and questioned whether its doctrine is undergoing a radical transformation, a transformation which might bring the high stakes arms racing of the Cold War to South Asia. To explore these questions and discuss India’s nuclear future, the UK Project on Nuclear Issues (UK PONI) hosted Gaurav Kampani of Cornell University for a seminar on the 6 February at the RUSI Library of Military History.

Mr Kampani discussed how India’s nuclear doctrine has evolved and influenced the shape of its nuclear forces, and explore how this relationship might affect arms racing, deterrence, and crisis stability in South Asia. The seminar was held on-the-record, and was followed by a Q&A session and a drinks reception.

This event was open to UK PONI members only.

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