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Alan Rusbridger on the 21st Century Surveillance State: Implications of the Snowden Revelations

19 January 2015, 13:00
Alan Rusbridger, Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian, will outline the processes that the paper went through leading up to its decision to publish some of the documents leaked by Edward Snowden. In his lecture, he will consider the nature of press freedom today and assess the ramifications of the story which raise questions about the public interest, consent, the role of parliament, legality, privacy, oversight and the integrity of the web.
 

Alan Rusbridger, Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian, outlined the processes that the paper went through leading up to its decision to publish some of the documents leaked by Edward Snowden. In his lecture, he considered the nature of press freedom today and assess the ramifications of the story which raise questions about the public interest, consent, the role of parliament, legality, privacy, oversight and the integrity of the web.

Alan Rusbridger has been Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian since 1995. During his editorship, the paper has fought a number of high profile battles over libel and press freedom, including cases involving Neil Hamilton, Jonathan Aitken, the Police Federation, Trafigura, freedom of information and Wikileaks. The Guardian broke world exclusive stories by publishing NSA documents leaked by Edward Snowden and was recently awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Alan has been awarded the Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism by Harvard's Joan Shorenstein Centre and received the Burton Benjamin Memorial Award for lifetime achievement in the cause of press freedom from the Committee to Protect Journalists. He recently received an honorary doctorate from Oslo University and the Tully Free Speech Award from Syracuse University.

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