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Are the Arts and Humanities Relevant to Security?

21 November 2016, 12:30
RUSI Whitehall
This seminar will seek to challenge assumptions that the arts and humanities are irrelevant or not applicable to serious political and social questions, and explore ways in which academic research can have impact in the security field.

Academics and practitioners with an arts and humanities background will discuss the contribution they and their discipline are making to security, whether academically or practically.

Contributors will include:

  • John Bew, Professor in History and Foreign Policy at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. Professor Bew is the author of acclaimed political biographies – most recently, of Clement Attlee – and a study of realpolitik. He is also co-author of Talking to Terrorists:  Making Peace in Northern Ireland and the Basque Country (Columbia University Press, 2009).
  • Andrew Glazzard, Senior Research Fellow at RUSI, who will speak on the opportunities – and limitations – of countering terrorists and violent extremists through ‘counter-narrative’. 
  • Elisabeth Kendall,  Senior Research Fellow in Arabic and Islamic Studies at Pembroke College, Oxford. The co-editor of Twenty-First Century Jihad: Law, Society and Military Action (I.B. Tauris, 2015), Dr Kendall will speak on one of her current research interests, poetry as a medium of jihadist propaganda.
  • Peter Morey, Professor of English and Post-Colonial Studies at the University of East London, and a Leadership Fellow with the Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research (previously Global Uncertainties). Professor Morey’s major current project is ‘Muslims, Trust and Cultural Dialogue’, which explores how trust between Muslims and non-Muslims can be built in three different spheres: politics and citizenship; culture and the arts; and business and finance.
  • Simon Mundy, Chairman of Creative Guild and an author, broadcaster, and cultural policy adviser. He has researched the intersection between culture and conflict, and will speak on the use of culture as a political tool – to promote as well as to alleviate conflict.

The event is free but attendees must register in advance. Places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. To register please click on the 'Register Now' button. For further information please contact Lieke Bos at RUSI  on liekeb@rusi.org.

This is a Society for Educational Studies (SES) Seminar Series

Open to All

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